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#Bregret – Many British Citizens Call for Second Referendum

Because of the continuous failure by Britain and the European Union to reach an agreement, various voices are now calling for a second referendum regarding Brexit. The demands reveal the deep divide in British society regarding the economic and political future of the country.

The sudden call for a new referendum was mainly initiated by the Final Say campaign launched by The Independent to address the lack of public participation in May’s Brexit deal. Today, the campaign has garnered more than 845,000 supporters.

 Prime Minister Theresa May opposes a second referendum. Credit: PA/ Express UK

Prime Minister Theresa May opposes a second referendum. Credit: PA/Express UK

Those who argue for another referendum point to the lack of participation among young voters in the first referendum as evidence of the need for a second vote. They contest the “ideological obsessions” of Prime Minister Theresa May and her supporters, which they believe sacrifice economic success.

May herself has a very clear stance on the issue. At the Tory Party Conference this week, she stood by the results of the people’s vote. May states that a second referendum would only be a “politician’s vote.”

According to statista, 43 percent of British people do indeed favor a second referendum, while 51 percent do not. However, statistics show that if there were to be a second vote, 55 percent would vote to remain in the EU, flipping the original decision. The polls show the issue to be highly contentious, but its support is certainly not limited to a political elite trying to influence public opinion.

 Projected outcome if there were to be a second referendum on Brexit (left) and breakdown of those for and against a second referendum (right).

Projected outcome if there were to be a second referendum on Brexit (left) and breakdown of those for and against a second referendum (right).

The question of whether or not to hold a new referendum is particularly heated within May’s Tory party. According to Phillip Lee, a former supporter of May and resigned justice minister, there are at least three ministers within the Tory party that would support a referendum. Supporters of a second vote believe this number could rise to 40.

However, it seems as if the media consensus is still predicting the success of Brexit without a new referendum. If this prediction stands, analysts assume there will be a strong shift toward leftist parties after May leaves office.